Learn Real Estate Investment: Your Comprehensive Guide to Getting Started

risks of buying foreclosed house

When I started investing in real estate over two decades ago, I had the mindset that it would be similar to exercising—I would take the initial step to get started; there would be a training montage (think: Rocky Balboa); and then, all of a sudden, results! But when it comes to getting in shape or investing in real estate, results don’t just appear out of thin air. Both take time, effort, and knowledge.

In my opinion, education is the single most important aspect of launching your real estate investment career. To be able to learn from the experiences of others, and absorb wisdom, is the best way to get started.

But how do you learn real estate investment? How do you know what to do in a business where no two transactions are the same?

There are a lot of ways that people try to learn real estate investing when looking to kick-start their business. While some may feel that one method works better than others, it’s always best to find the one that you feel is right for you. If you’re not sure where to start, this guide to learning about real estate investments can point you in the right direction.

Where to Learn About Real Estate Investments

Imagine that you could hire the world’s smartest and most successful home fix-and-flipper to make all the investment decisions for you. You’d more than likely find great properties to rehab and sell. But, you’d probably be spending way more than you’d like to for advice that doesn’t guarantee an ROI. 

The flip side of that is asking your uncle, who might not be in real estate investing but spends a lot of time watching HGTV. He may be able to offer you free advice that won’t cost you anything upfront, but it may not be the best approach for your business. 

As with everything else in real estate investing, you have to consider how the outlay cost influences the ROI. The most expensive way isn’t always the best, and the cheapest way doesn’t always save you money. There’s no surefire way to success; there are multiple channels and a lot of paths. Below you’ll find a few ways that may help you on your path to learning about real estate investments. You can choose to explore each of them but remember to be considerate of your time and budget. 

YouTube Channels 

There are thousands of real estate investing channels on YouTube run by people who are either promoting a well-known brand or trying to establish their own. Some of them offer practical advice while others may be run by grifters who don’t know anything about the market. 

When evaluating YouTube channels, there are a few things to look for:

  • Frequently updated content: The market is always changing; outdated videos won’t necessarily be helpful.
  • Actionable advice: Are they offering vague platitudes, or giving you information you can use?
  • Less pushy monetization: Sure, anyone deserves to be paid for their services. But, you shouldn’t feel pressured to purchase more content (such as a guide or book) to receive their help.

Videos can be a time-efficient way to learn real estate investments, but it might be more helpful if the conversation wasn’t one-way.

Mentoring Programs

A way to avoid having to learn from one-way conversations on YouTube channels is to take the mentorship approach. It can be a way of receiving personal advice from a professional. There are a lot of different types of mentorship programs run through REIAs and schools, for example. But, be careful because they can get pretty pricey.

One-on-one training through a real estate club, for example, can cost you a couple of grand—at a minimum. Hiring a popular real estate investing mentor can range from $5,000-$10,000. If you’re not looking for a large initial investment, there are some who work on a “let’s split the profit” model.

Mentorship can be a knowledge accelerant. If you’re working with the right mentor, you’re likely going to get a lot of info. You may also end up spending a lot. Another thing to consider is that not all mentorships are ongoing; you’ll have to find a way to get as much as you can out of the sessions.

Classes/Seminars

Maybe a private mentor isn’t in your budget, but you still want some interaction and in-person or virtual learning. A really good approach is to take a real estate investing course or attend a seminar taught by a professional, virtually or in-person if possible. Here are a few types to consider:

  • Classes taught by industry experts: These are sort of like the YouTube channel idea—advice from named professionals. They can be pretty expensive and aren’t typically full semesters.
  • Higher-education: Many colleges and universities offer real estate investment classes. The cost depends on the institution and if tuition assistance is available.
  • Real estate investment clubs: Many investment clubs offer their own education, which usually comes free with membership or at a minimal cost.

Classes can be very helpful, but as with everything else, it depends on the teacher. You most likely want a working pro, someone who still has their finger on the pulse.

Individual Research

We live in an age when everyone is an autodidact. I recently had a conversation about the different types of mRNA vaccines and how they stop viruses. When a year ago I didn’t know the difference between viruses and bacteria. You’d be surprised how much you can learn from conducting a thorough Google search.

It’s tempting to think that’s a great way to learn real estate investments. After all, it is free. And, free is good; any return is a positive ROI. But, it should be noted that there is a lot of misinformation out there. Any given link could be a great piece of information or someone’s opinion.

If you are going to conduct online research, I would recommend reading information on reputable sites and blogs.

  • Classes taught by industry experts: These are sort of like the YouTube channel idea—advice from named professionals. They can be pretty expensive and aren’t typically full semesters.
  • Higher-education: Many colleges and universities offer real estate investment classes. The cost depends on the institution and if tuition assistance is available.
  • Real estate investment clubs: Many investment clubs offer their own education, which usually comes free with membership or at a minimal cost.

Classes can be very helpful, but as with everything else, it depends on the teacher. You most likely want a working pro, someone who still has their finger on the pulse.

Learn Real Estate Investment Strategies That Last

To me, the best kind of real estate investment education is the kind that kick-starts your career and can last throughout. That’s why I’ve always been impressed with the training and education that comes with being an independently owned and operated HomeVestors® franchise. Since I became one about 15 years ago, I’ve seen the impact it has on those starting out.

HomeVestors® offers education in a few different ways

  • Training: A comprehensive real estate training course taught by some experts who are actually working pros. You learn how to get and evaluate leads, how to finance deals, how to sell, and tips on running your real estate investment business.
  • Ongoing mentorship: The ongoing mentorship is really like having a coach. You can talk to them about how to close, how to communicate with owners, and how to build a network of contractors and buyers, for example. HomeVestors mentors care about helping you reach your goals.
best real estate investing youtube channels will only get you so far

If you’re not sure where to begin when it comes to your real estate investing career, you should look for personalized training and mentorship. HomeVestors offers both—ongoing education kick-started by comprehensive training with no gimmicks. Becoming a HomeVestors® franchisee is an investment that can help you produce a positive ROI. If you want to learn real estate investment, request information about becoming a franchisee today.

Each franchise office is independently owned and operated.

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